Back to the Aquarium – Everybody Else

And after the sharks, the jelly fish, the rays and the reef, there is all of the other amazing animals at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada in Toronto.

See also: Shark Tank, Jelly Fish & Friends, Reef Madness and Call Me Ray

And that’s the (mostly) truth – my new bio

Okay, so my producer for SomeTV!, the sketch comedy insanity currently in production in Toronto, asked me to provide him a short bio for the group’s web site.

Keeping in mind the sheer brilliance/stupidity of what we are attempting, I sent him this:

A born story-teller and punster, Randall told his first knock-knock joke in the Obstetrics Department of a Toronto hospital at the ripe old age of today. His early comedic repertoire consisted of poop jokes, fart jokes and snot jokes, but on learning that Vaudeville was dead, he learned how to write. After several failed attempts at living other people’s lives (scientist, journalist, press agent, ad man), he has more recently focused his energy on sketch comedy and screenwriting. In 2014, Randall won the Nashville Film Festival award for Best Animated Feature for his screenplay Tank’s. His influences are caffeine, Mel Brooks, sleep deprivation and human frailty.

Would love to hear your thoughts!

Randy (the one in the middle)

Image

Back to the Aquarium – Call me Ray

Aside from the shark tank, rays also have their own tanks where they rule the roost at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada in Toronto.

See also: Shark Tank, Jelly Fish & Friends and Reef Madness

Crowds are fickle beasts – Crowd-funding conundrum

I pledge: To stop whinging about or rolling my eyes at stories about some big film company or Hollywood star using crowd-funding to support their latest endeavours, whether in part or in whole (e.g., Veronica Mars movie, Zach Braff, Corner Gas movie).

Artistic life support

Although many of us probably assumed that crowd-funding was designed to give the little guy or gal a leg up in the pursuit of his or her dream, it is merely a vehicle for fundraising and gauging public interest in projects of any type. Period. Full stop.

Given the potential cash-cow it represents, companies and individuals of all stripes would be foolhardy not to take advantage of this opportunity.

I have heard and have argued that these mega-projects take attention and dollars away from smaller projects that might never otherwise see the light of day. There may be merit in this argument…but I don’t know that it matters.

The crowd-funding companies get a piece of the action, so you know they’re good with the big-ticket projects. They are not charities, despite being used by charities.

If the small independents want an exclusive, altruistic crowd-funding domain then they can start one and make up their own rules for which projects are allowed in and which ones aren’t.

The marketing angle is built in: Stick it to The Man, even if she’s The Woman. (Unless, of course, the crowd-funding site is dedicated to projects led exclusively by women.)

Crowdfunding

(Images are property of owners and are used here without permission because the post office was too crowded.)

Back to the Aquarium – Reef madness

For its sheer variety of creatures and its rainbow mosaic of colours, the coral reef displays are high on my list when visiting the Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada in Toronto.

See also: Shark Tank and Jelly Fish & Friends

Back to the Aquarium – Jelly fish and friends

After having fun with the sharks at Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada in Toronto, we moved onto the jelly fish exhibit!

See also: Shark tank

Back to the Aquarium – Shark Tank

Last Friday, I took my wonderful friend Victoria to the Ripley’s Aquarium of Canada in Toronto, her first time there and my second. And of course, I had my camera along (which means I can only suspect Victoria was there, my face buried in my camera as it was).

Today’s pics are of the tunnel through the shark tank. Other photos will appear over the next several days.

PS I welcome you to check out Victoria’s blog: Victoriously.