Movie memories for 2015

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For a guy trying to make it as a screenwriter, it takes a lot for me to go out and pay to watch a movie. I think it’s, at least in part, because I don’t deal well with disappointment and particularly when I’ve had to pay for it.

Luckily, my friends had some luck dragging me out of the house this year, so below, I offer one-line critiques of the various films I saw in theatres (with hyperlinks to longer reviews I’ve written).

Taken 3: When the hell did I see this, and more importantly, why?

Paddington: Charming and a lot of fun.

Kingsman: A rollicking good time.

It Follows: It bores me

Ex Machina: Oh My Deus, was this written by a robot devoid of emotions?

Age of Ultron: Miss a movie, lose a thread; think I am out of this series.

Mad Max Fury Road: You will believe a man can drive…that is all.

Inside Out: Underwhelmed, but appreciate I am only one.

Self/Less: Flawed but interesting

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Trainwreck: Not one, but Schumer can do better

Ant-Man: Most fun I’d had all year…Rudd is perfect for this

Man from UNCLE: Stylish throwback that I liked more than most people did

The Martian: Surprise hit for me; kudos to all including author of book

Steve Jobs: A metaphor for dysfunction…and sadly, not in a good way

In the Heart of the Sea: More like in the heart of my sleep

Star Wars The Force Awakens: Visually stunning, overly sentimental, disappointingly regurgitated story

Spectre: Good movie with a stupid ending…am I outgrowing Bond?

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The Force Awakens…to a Khan job (SPOILERS)

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J. J. Abrams is on my shit list.

That statement alone should tell you everything you need to know about my experience with Star Wars: The Force Awakens (Ep. VII).

As background: I am old enough to have seen Star Wars: A New Hope (Ep. IV) in theatres as a young teenager. And I was so impressed by the film that I immediately came home from the theatre and wrote a sequel…400 hand-written pages of a screenplay. My first screenplay, in fact, at the ripe maturity of 13 years.

Star Wars is my birthright. I will defend it tooth and nail.

Thus, J. J. Abrams is on my shit list.

After the underwhelming prequels (Ep. I-III), I looked forward to Abrams’ take on the saga. I was a big fan of his reboot of Star Trek, although I had a bit of a nagging doubt after the reboot sequel Into Darkness. But if anyone had a sense of the epic, almost operatic scale of the Star Wars universe, it should have been Abrams.

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And to some extent, he fulfilled his end of the bargain.

Shivers went down my spine when we scaled across the vast deserts of Tatooine…I mean Jakku.

I worried when R2…I mean BB-8, was captured by the Jawas…I mean scrap metal scavengers.

I bounced happily with the music of the Mos Eisley cantina…I mean the Takodana cantina.

I cheered when R2 successfully arrived at the Rebel base…I mean BB-8 arrived at the Resistance base with the vital information.

I sat back in awe as I saw the might of the Death Star…I mean Starkiller Base, for the first time.

J. J. Abrams is on my shit list.

To get back to Star Trek: Into Darkness, briefly, we all knew that Abrams was rewriting the story of Kirk’s greatest nemesis Khan Noonien Singh. And the movie didn’t disappoint in its grand opening flourishes and early Starfleet intrigue.

But then, at some point, it was like Abrams had run out of ideas and so simply inserted the last 20 pages or so of the original Wrath of Khan screenplay, hoping we wouldn’t notice.

The least tweaked moment of overlap between the two movies was the scene between Spock and Kirk across the glass as one dies from radiation sickness. Abrams simply swapped the positions of the two characters.

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Some might consider this an homage to the original. A friend of mine, in discussing The Force Awakens, called it alt-universe mirroring. I call it bullshit, and lazy bullshit at that.

Now, Into Darkness was not intended to be a prequel to any of the older Star Trek movies, so I can buy into the alt-universe idea a bit. But The Force Awakens is Ep VII of a saga. It is not an alt-universe but the same freaking universe 30 years later.

An homage is the holographic chess set. An homage is NOT a beat-for-beat repetition of Ep IV, even if jumbled up a little bit and with a few scenes from Ep V and Ep VI thrown in.

The spell of childhood memories faded rapidly as The Force Awakens played out on the screen, and I spent much of movie sitting with an attitude of “Really?”

And as I walked home from the theatre…a 40-minute walk…I just got angrier and angrier as the volume and sheer audacity of the parallels continued to sink in.

J. J. Abrams is on my shit list.

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“You’re pretty bang on, but it’s what I was expecting,” explained a friend whose ear I bent. “It’s the old ‘the same, but different’.”

“I saw it more as a mirroring of the previous six films; a device to draw in new fans and satiate old fans,” another friend said.

I call bullshit…not of my friends, you understand, but of the idea that The Force Awakens needed to remind us of the saga up to now or reinvigorate fans.

Please, how could anything from the Star Wars saga fail to draw box office records?

I know I’m in the minority here. Most fans won’t clue into any of the parallels but instead simply wrap themselves in the old familiar or marvel at the new spectacle. Cool, I am glad they enjoyed the film.

Even I will likely see it again as my first viewing was in regular 3D—strange to think of that as a thing—and not in IMAX or AVX.

And as much as I would buy Henry IV, Part Three if Shakespeare wrote a sequel to his first two Henry IVs, I will eventually add this movie to my Star Wars collections.

But J. J. Abrams is on my shit list, and I will approach any of his future movies with suspicion and cynicism.

And that, more than anything, I am saddest about.

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When numbers fail (DDNews commentary)

Dutee Chand

Athletics bodies have questioned whether sprinter Dutee Chand has an unfair advantage.

What is normal?

The question may sound absurdly philosophical, particularly for the pages of DDNews, and yet healthcare directly or indirectly deals with this question on a daily basis. And the clinical response can be as life-altering as the societal and political responses that we see on the news every night.

An entire industry has been created to test and monitor health using various diagnostic assays, to the most recent of which DDNews dedicates an entire section. In some cases, the results of these assays are binary—the classic example is being a little bit pregnant. But in most cases, healthy (or normal) falls within a range of values—think LDL/HDL, blood glucose or body temperature.

In part, this is a recognition that results can vary within an individual throughout the day, and on the larger scale, because individuals are products of their genetics and environments. What might be a healthy level for me in Toronto may actually be limiting in Johannesburg.

But even with the recognition of variability, we must always be vigilant in questioning how the normal range was defined. Was it based on the combined results of 200 male Manitoba bush pilots (I have read such a study), or a sampling of tens of thousands of individuals from around the world? If only for economic reasons, the former is more likely to be the case.

In 2011, Boston University’s Shalinder Bhasin and colleagues examined this challenge by identifying reference ranges for testosterone in healthy men. Suggesting that these ranges “have been derived previously mostly from small convenience samples or from hospital or clinic-based patients,” they examined a much larger cohort from the Framingham Heart Study (Gen 3), publishing their results in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

Although most values were consistent with historic values, their lower limit of total testosterone was higher than that used historically but was “closer to the thresholds associated with sexual and physical symptoms in a recent investigation of older men.” Thus, when it comes to testosterone, it seems (sample) size matters.

But what about the outliers, the norms who don’t fit the norms and the unwell who do?

As a bit of a sidestep, just over a year ago, the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) banned Indian sprinter Dutee Chand from competing in sanctioned competitions because her blood testosterone levels fell into the normal range of male athletes rather than that of her female competitors. Thus, the group decided, she would have an unfair advantage over her fellow runners.

What made this ruling particularly challenging, however, was that Chand’s testosterone levels were natural; they did not come about from doping. Her levels simply fell outside of the clinically accepted norm for women.

Closer to home for me are two friends who live with symptoms of hypothyroidism and have resorted to alternative medicine because they were dissatisfied with the medical establishment. In both cases, standard thyroid function tests suggest they fall within the normal range and therefore would not benefit from standard treatment. This may be true, but neither knows because it was never tried.

Admittedly, these are anecdotes. Three women struggle because they do not fit ascribed definitions, whether of health or pathology. And for every anecdote I can list, the healthcare establishment can rightly point to hundreds if not thousands of individuals who fit the defined ranges of normalcy.

It’s a conundrum I have discussed previously: healthcare is population-based while health is personal.

In our zeal to standardize healthcare and make medicine more scientific, we have to be careful not to ignore the natural variabilities of individuals within those populations. So-called normal ranges should suggest action, not dictate it.

Even as we pursue the precision medicine mandate, spending billions (and possibly trillions) of dollars on expanding our understanding of human biology and generating technologies to value every facet of it, we have to make sure that our knowledge doesn’t blind us to the patient’s truth. If that happens, if all we accomplish is a bigger monolith, then we have failed in the mission.

As to Chand’s racing career, the Court of Arbitration for Sport recently overturned the IAAF’s rule, giving them two years to prove that the higher testosterone levels truly give the runner an unfair advantage.

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Originally published in DDNews in September 2015, this is one of a series of commentaries I write each year. If you’re interested in recent technological and business innovations in biotech, pharma and healthcare, you should check the publication out.

Toronto’s Christmas night

Before being pre-empted by my Christmas eve wanderings, the plan had been to wander the downtown core on Christmas evening (Dec 25th, to avoid confusion).

Memories new and old

With nothing to do on Christmas Eve and no family to prepare for, I decided to visit my grandparents, who currently reside in the ultimate retirement village: St. John’s Norway Cemetery. And, of course, what is a family get-together without pictures.

 

Be aware of the dangers of having Canadian friends

Who knew the Toronto Marlies had such reach

Ned's Blog

imageI have several good blogger friends who are Canadians. I realize that many of you are now slowly shaking your head with that “I told you so” expression.

But I really try not to judge people or their cultures, no matter how strange or foreign they seem to me.

For the record, I have friends from southern California, too.

But let’s get back to Canada, where my friend and humour (see how I spelled that?) blogger Randall Willis resides. In Toronto, Ontario actually. I’d give you his exact address but it resembles the coordinates for a Space Shuttle landing. I’m not sure why Canadians use all those numbers and letters, but I’m guessing it has something to do with the metric system. All I know is it would take me longer to put the address into my car’s GPS system than it would to drive aimlessly until I found him by…

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12 Days of Gratitude – Honourable Mentions

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I have the great fortune to be surrounded by love and support from a variety of sources. But with that boon comes the curse of trying to select only 12 people for whom I am grateful.

And I failed…because I now present you with the handful of souls who didn’t make the original list but who I cannot NOT thank and honour. You all mean the world to me.

Mike & Lee

Mike & Lee: Truly devoted friends who ask nothing and offer everything.

Victoria

Victoria: Always quick with a supportive smile, heart-warming giggle and welcoming spirit.

Marlies

Marlies family: Collective chaos and maniacal wit with as many facets as faces. (not all members shown here)

Asmara

Asmara: A glowing spirit who befriends all.

Mike & Nana

Mike: The buddy for when you need to bury a body, no questions asked. Devoted friend, father, husband.

agah

Agah: Debate master and brother-man from another motherland, all packaged with devotion and dedication